Village Girl


Logs ( 9 )

Village Girl

A trilogy in umpteen parts.

We have a new boat! Or at least a new old boat. Long story but she was looking forlorn with long kelpy weed and barnacles in Friday Harbour with a faded “For Sale” notice drooping from her rig. We noticed that she has an outboard motor well in the cockpit – perfect for a pedal drive unit…Coincidentally, the owner saw us and offered her to us for the outstanding marina fees – we borrowed wetsuits and dived and looked and she’s now ours. Woody, the owner, had owned her for 27 years and she has some robust repairs – WYSIWYG – and he told us all he knew about her faults. We sailed her to Anacortes, then to Port Townsend, back to Anacortes and she’s now sitting in the dry storage yard in Port Townsend waiting for Megan to arrive in April in her best fibreglassing overalls to fix a couple of patches and launch her for R2AK 2019. Then we’ll go and finish the thing and perhaps sail her further than Ketchikan. Wishful thinking but a nice maybe project. She’s a South Coast Seacraft 23 – perhaps better known as an Alberg 23 – if you google either of them you should get to this http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=304 An old design but seaworthy and from the days when fibreglass boats were rather better built than today. Carl Alberg designed a lot of similar boats and they are all good boats. She’s called Village Girl. She’s tiny, but bigger than Bobbles and a bit more suitable for The Project. Bobbles is in Portland and the plan is to get her to Homer to sail on Katchemak Bay and then maybe back to Portland in a few years as a sail trainer for a couple of kids we know. more as it happens

Village Girl

Wingnuts and Village Girl

https://r2ak.com/2019-teams-full-race/team-wingnuts/?fbclid=IwAR0tIqgz0zEBEuokxl2eNEYM8X2K9AQ3hvgsN1WyMtaB2nas2wsPwSSuxdc So here we go again, back to do it properly this time. Village Girl is a step up from Bobbles but getting to Ketchikan is by no means a done deed. Why Wingnuts do I hear you ask? It has a few meanings – big ears and no brains, perhaps, or perceived as odd, eccentric and extreme, both of which seem to fit the bill. It’s also a derogatory term for an extremely conservative politician, so add irony by the spadeful. We will rendezvous in Port Townsend in April to get VG sorted and this time, we will try to break anything that’s going to break in time to fix it before the start. We’ll crank up this blog as we go.

Village Girl

Howl.

Sylvie Branton, the lovely talented wonderful person who created this website died this morning in Grenada. I’m devastated but I rejoice for her life and our friendship. Love and hugs to her family and a bunch of flowers in the teleport for her. Her creativity will live on.

Village Girl

Sylvie

Village Girl

Press here to restart…

Back in Port Townsend with Village Girl on crutches in the yard. Megan has spent 2 weeks sanding, priming, antifouling and generally fixing and it’s happening. Huge to-do list and a month to get it all working. Pedal drive being put together by The Cyclist and rowing station by the Decrepit Old Rower. The mast comes out next week and we’ll be on survival gruel once we get the bill for that but it has to be done. The yard is flat out launching boats and our launch date is May 22nd officially, but I’m sure we’ll get a slot before that once we are ready. Then it really begins. Sporadic internet so more as it happens.

Village Girl

Sphinctorial musings.

VG progresses. Decrepit Old Fart seems at last to have head in gear. Started this note about a week ago but the butterfly’s wing in Paraguay must be beating so hard that the turbulence distorts The Plan, such as it is. In in a project like this, there are so many trivial details that must be dealt with as their heads appear above the muddy surface else they will give the Examiner stuff to play with later. The list changes by the hour sometimes and is never short of attitude. We are on the skinniest of tight budgets and most of what we are using is very second hand. Recycle, fudge and bodge is the go. And logistics – I’m trying to organise an affordable Iridium Go contract so’s we can post during and after the race while out of mobile range. And how do we get the outboard to Ketchikan? And meh! We lifted the mast yesterday and that’s a job all of its own…photos tomorrow perhaps. For the initiated, Cakebob has his own list and his own universe. He may get antifouled. I’m slowly getting used to what is euphemistically known as the bathroom here. That curvy bit of porcelain is not something I’d care to bathe in but there ya go. I have a dissertation in mind about the Fundamental Processes associated with said porcelain and occasional lack of same. Gravity, length of flight, the characteristics of streamlined bodies and water entry, splash avoidance, consistency and elasticity of extrusion and all things turdular. PPP, El Pinko and Eeyore are supervising the works. Eeyore doesn’t think we’ll find VGs tail.

Village Girl

Red hot spikes and other stuff

What a week! It’s been Sydney hot and we have no usable shade so dehydration is a hazard to be respected. The Examiner nearly got us both yesterday. The little boat is in great nick for her age – I wonder how you compare boat ages to human. I seem to remember that dogs get about 14 years for their four score years and ten but boats? VG has been in Australia about as long as I have – she was built in 1967 ish by East Coast Seacraft, so she’s already 52 but apart from the usual battle scars she’s better that a lot of today’s production boats. Heavier, no internal volume so very cramped for 2 people but structurally she’s got another 50 years with TLC. I’ve spent the last 3 days rebuilding the mast — a new half inch PVC tube (called a case here) for the wiring, new nav lights, coax fittings for the VHF antenna and putting it all together. Rivetting the case to the inside of the mast was interesting – careful measurement, pairs of holes drilled through the mast every 2 metres or so and then a red hot spike through the drill holes and into the plastic to make holes first for holding screws and then rivets. A very hot long day’s work with much walking from one end to the other and not a little frustration. But it happened. PTR rigging have been wonderful, lending us their tools and workshop and lots of advice and they will run the halyards next week. There will, of course, be a bill but hey! Meanwhile Megan melded 2 cast off hatch covers we found in a dumpster into one, removed the sliding hatch and built a parapet around the sliding hatch coamings and fitted a new and very different opening hatch. We think that it will work well with a little dodger. Huge job. Cross ‘em! We need to have it all sorted in the next week or so.


Village Girl

Col. regs. Rule 33

Yesterday evening we went for a walk along the inner marina wall to get over the day and I noticed a masthead light flashing across on the other side of the marina. A jerk of recognition – something I’ve never seen for real, only in practice but a genuine SOS. We were standing next to the coastguard complex and Megan phoned the duty number, to be told that they did not have the resources to check and would we? They did give us their Seattle HQ number. Yay! We hurried round the 10 minute walk, working out what to do if…someone injured? Hostage situation? Boat on fire? Stupid joke? Silly mistake? We checked in with a man in another boat on the jetty as we approached and he said he’d seen the crew leaving 2 hours earlier. We discovered that it was another R2ak boat which we both knew about but we approached with some caution to find the boat open, lights on below and apparently nobody aboard. We left them a note and our phone number and Megan got a thank you text this morning. All’s well etc. but could have been a bit tricky. We weren’t a ship at sea but reg. 33 is a basic rule for us all.

Village Girl

If you grip the twig for long enough…

the competitors get a bit thin on the ground. Today was the Port Townsend Rhody run – final event in the Spring Festival. Megan, our friends Martin and Ingrid and I all ran it. Brutal, hilly 12k or in local terms 7.3 miles. Ugly, it was and I had to walk a lot of it but hey! 3rd and a medal. There were 987 finishers. Megan beat me by nearly 12 minutes which, I think, is the beginning of the end. The economists’ supply/demand graph comes to mind and that crossover point. Supply is running down.